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by Carlos Amato / 24.11.2009

The idea of anthropogenic climate change is no longer just a sacred cow. It’s now also a cash cow.

Too many cushy jobs, research grants and political careers depend on the continued acceptance of the hypothesis that we’re cooking our planet with carbon emissions. That hypothesis may well be true, but at present it’s still just an educated guess.

Skepticism is in order – not just because of the various vested interests, but because the hypothesis itself is anti-poor. It demands a course of action that could wreck the developing world’s low-tech, commodity-driven economies. Hundreds of millions of poor people will probably get even poorer if the world reduces its carbon output significantly.

Experts assure us that poor countries will bear the brunt of climate change — but they don’t tell us we’ll bear the brunt of emissions cuts.

Besides, we can’t afford to fret about the weather. We’re too busy trying to get out of the ghetto. And if you think that droughts in Africa are a new thing, you haven’t been here very long.

In South Africa, green rhetoric has been embraced by local business, if not acted upon. Emissions-measuring has become a hollow, mendacious marketing ploy: corporations are “greenwashing” products that will always be profoundly not-green.

Take a recent South African ad campaign punting a climate-friendly cement brand, Afrisam, whose manufacture apparently involves slightly less fouling of the atmosphere than that of its rivals.

That’s a bit like selling lean bacon as “pig-friendly” bacon. If the climate-change hypothesis is accepted at all, then tiny reductions in emissions amount to nothing more than deck-chair-shuffling, particularly if applied to innately filthy products like cement.

If a cement firm genuinely believes that its emissions are threatening our planet’s survival, then they should close down right away. Are we really saving the world, or are we saving our profits?

Because if the former is true, then it’s time to get primitive – and quickly. Renewable energy technology will take many years of development before it’s cheap and efficient enough to power our economies. In the meantime, shouldn’t we all stop driving and flying and building houses and buying stuff that isn’t made in our regions?

How many South Africans are willing to make personal sacrifices to cut emissions? Not many. Not me. Because we’re not really that worried – because the weather is not really that disturbing.

It’s just weather, and weather has been consistently weird since the Big Bang. Floods and droughts are old news. Ask the old dirty bastards who brought you the Old Testament.

And taking serious action to cut emissions would be calamitous. It would cripple our fossil-fuelled global economy. Politicians can’t sell that to voters, which means it can’t be done. That’s democracy at its most brutally sensible. But instead of confronting that truth, we all pretend that a few solar geysers and fluorescent lightbulbs and fuel-efficient cars will do the job. They won’t even come close.

Assuming, of course, that there’s a job to do in the first place. What the climate establishment won’t admit is that plenty of respected scientists quietly doubt that carbon emissions are the main cause of warming. Increased solar activity or a complex of other unknown factors might be the real culprits. Some scientists and economists question whether cutting emissions is the solution at all, even if the greenhouse theory does turn out to be correct. It could well be too late.

Some reckon our best strategy is simply to prepare for higher sea levels. Building dykes around the Cape Flats might be a good idea.

But it’s been a decade since the hottest year on record, which was 1998, when a big fat El Nino was doing its thing in the Pacific. During the decade since, temperatures have dipped, then risen, then dipped, then risen. The underlying trend is unclear.

The much-threatened surge in sea levels is not happening. Antarctic ice is expanding as fast as Arctic ice is retreating. The oceans are getting more acidic, which is killing coral reefs, which is tragic, but it can’t be described as a calamity for humankind.

I’m not arguing there’s nothing to worry about. But if we’re not prepared to radically curb our lifestyles in response to what the scientists are telling us, then we should be honest about it.

Image © and courtesy Jason Bronkhorst. Check more of his styles here.

17   6
RESPONSES (39)
  1. Torquemada says:

    “How many South Africans are willing to make personal sacrifices to cut emissions? Not many. Not me.”

    Speak for yourself, mate.

    You might not give a toss about emissions – and by admission you clearly do not – but then it’s likely you don’t live on the coast, where the impact of climate change is not up for discussion, as it’s a fact of life – take a walk along any part of KZN and see for yourself the recession of the high water mark.

    “…the weather is not really that disturbing.” ?

    “The much-threatened surge in sea levels is not happening.” ?

    I dunno where you get your info from, Carlos, but you’re talking out of your ass.

    Tell it to Pastor Ray McCauley, who has almost lost the front yard of his beachfront holiday home, which is built (illegally) within the zone demarcated as the Admiralty Reserve in Umhlanga. Did he deserve to kak himself because all of a sudden an ‘Act of God’ was destroying his property? Damn right he did. Sorry, Ray, but you’re a pillock and you get what you deserve.

    Tell it to the eThekwini Municipality, who are at present shoring up the Golden Mile with sandbags on one front, and pumping shitloads of sand along the beaches on the other, in order to prevent the beaches from being swept away by the next tropical cyclone which will further cause the high water mark to retreat. Not that disturbing? Do you have to be personally affected before you revise your opinion that it’s ‘not that disturbing’? Do you think it was ‘not disturbing’ for the families of those who drowned in flash floods in KZN last week? Do you think that those who lost their lives, houses and family members in the Molweni disaster at this time last year would consider climate change ‘not disturbing’?

    ‘Oh, that? Ag, just a gust. Mind you, we did lose everything we own, the chickens, the dogs, the car and…oh, that’s right…and most of our family are now tilapia food in the river. It’ll be alright though; wasn’t anything to do with climate change. We’ll just live…uh…under that overturned roof. Yes, I’m sure that’ll be fine.’

    Do me a favour: speak to the old folk. Ask them what they think. Might be an idea, considering they’ve been around a lot longer, and might – hey, just a thought – have experienced, oh, decades of climate? I’m just saying…

    But let’s not indulge in semantics – that’s a merry-go-round which goes nowhere. Let’s talk overpopulation – whilst the endless sparring between proponents and opponents of climate change goes on, the issue of overpopulation continues to be underplayed as the leading cause of environmental degradation. Even if you’re a dyed-in-the-blood climate change denialist and see no wrong in purchasing products which guarantee short-term gratification at the cost of long-term environmental disaster, you cannot dispute the fact that the planet we live on will not indefinitely support an ever-growing number of consumers whose only reason for living is to mindlessly obey the onslaught of ubiquitous advertising and raise a brood of good little consumers to follow their example. If you can’t see a direct correlation between overpopulation and the diminishing returns of our collective and amnesiac consumer lifestyle, you are in incurable imbecile. Not you, Carlos, but anyone.

    The sooner we stop reproducing at the present, unprecedented, rate, the better. For a start, we need to stop assuming that as a species we have a right to breed. It’s just that attitude which has seen us chew up and spit out an entire planet. All in the name of perpetuating a species?

    Newsflash, people: THERE ARE PLENTY OF US. WE’VE DONE A FANTASTIC JOB AT PERPETUATING OUR SPECIES. YOU CAN STOP NOW. TAKE A BREATHER.

    This is a reasonably well-thought out piece, and you state your case, fair enough. Just don’t expect everyone to be as blasé about the issues as you are.

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  2. Carlos says:

    @Torquemada
    Two points of fact:

    1. I’m not “talking out of my ass”. I’m just expressing a view you disagree with.

    2. Measuring global sea-level rises is extremely tricky — there is natural variation due to El Nino effects, while land (especially urban and island land) also subsides due to construction, rain erosion, beach-front construction, mining and removal of groundwater.

    But even if the much-questioned IPCC estimate of 2mm a year is accurate, it’s tough to observe such changes with the naked eye, as you suggest I do on the KZN coast.

    Storms happen, and they always have happened. Old people will remember storms that happened when they were little, and if they can’t, they have forgotten them.

    So Ray McCauley’s garden got wet. Big deal. It’s no cause for hysteria, and I think the emotion and hyperbole of your comment is sadly typical of much of the debate on climate change.

    As I said, I accept that anthropogenic global warming could well be happening. But doubt should be acknowledged, and rational dissidence should be respected.

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  3. Torquemada says:

    Further obfuscation in the face of the glaringly obvious. McCauley’s garden didn’t ‘get wet’ – it washed away. The ocean almost devoured his lawn.

    Storms happen, sure. Only, they just somehow happen to be happening with an intensity that’s unprecedented. How far back would you like to go, to prove that this is no more than a cycle? The Triassic period?

    Emotion and hyperbole is warranted – the situation is dire.

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  4. Carlos says:

    Emotional, hyperbolic arguments are never warranted — and least of all when the situation is dire, or seems dire.

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  5. Jason says:

    I don’t know what the stink is all about, Torque. You’re getting all red-faced about this threat to humanity. The best thing that can happen to this planet is that it rids itself of the parasite. Fun part is that you, me, us, are all part of the problem. No matter now many bottles you recycle or how many apple peels you chuck into your fancy compost maker, it’s just a matter of time til we’re all shrugged off this place.

    Good riddance!

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  6. Torquemada says:

    I don’t give a fig for humanity – it’s the rest of the planet I care for!

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  7. Jason says:

    Any place where a lech like ‘Pastor’ Ray McCauley can exist, and be taken seriously, is beyond saving anyway.

    Let’s blow this pop stand.

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  8. scary says:

    Cormac McCarthy’s The Road

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  9. The jackal speaks lies says:

    Carlos, you actually ARE talking out of your arse, not just expressing a different point of view. As Paul Gilding says, skepticism in science is good, but it translates into denialism in the broader community, and you are guilty of it here.

    Your statement “What the climate establishment won’t admit is that plenty of respected scientists quietly doubt that carbon emissions are the main cause of warming” is quite wrong. Since 2007, no scientific body of national or international standing has maintained a dissenting opinion. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_opinion_on_climate_change). Do yourself (and your readers) a favour and educate yourself before you reveal your ignorance. A good place to start is www. 350.org.

    Your claim – “Besides, we can’t afford to fret about the weather. We’re too busy trying to get out of the ghetto.” – is laughable. Climate change will make any other effort to reduce poverty totally meaningless. People seem to forget that there is no economy without an environment for it to take place in. And who is going to be worst affected – those with wealth or those without?

    “In the meantime, shouldn’t we all stop driving and flying and building houses and buying stuff that isn’t made in our regions?” – yes this is exactly what we should do, as well as stop buying huge quantities of cr*p that we don’t need, stop breeding like rabbits, and accept that we are not gods but part of nature and subject to its limits. But it’s much easier to stick our heads in the sand and write misleading, guilt-assuaging, buck-passing piles of cr*p like this.

    It’s a sad day when a piece like this is published on a site like Mahala. I have always been very proud of and loyal to Mahala – traditionally a beacon of rational thought and common sense, a source of accurate and good content, with a strong sense of social responsibility. In this instance I am disappointed and disgusted.

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  10. Berry says:

    Carlos, please post links to the scientists who doubt climate change.

    Your apathy is understandable, I have it to0 although for different reasons I suspect. I’ve tried to work out a way to change the system or consumerism and abusing the planet to feed our greed but the system is so deeply ingrained in the western psyche that I’ve despairingly stopped thinking about it. If we could only see that we are part of nature, here to live in harmony with the environment, not rape and destroy it as we currently do, then we would have a chance. The issue is not just climate change, the issue is getting ourselves to see that we need to live in balance with the environment. If we can do that, it would go a long way to stopping climate change.

    Torquemada, while I agree with you and then some, I reckon the earth will take care of itself once we’re gone. Have you read Derrick Jensen?

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  11. Derrick Jensen is the king says:

    @ Berry

    Derrick Jensen should be required reading for every person on earth in my opinion. One of the few sane people on earth.

    If you want to get a good idea of the western psyche then you should read “Ishmael” by Daniel Quinn.

    As Wilhelm Reich points out, to get out of the trap, you first need to confess you are in it, and “the trap is man’s emotional structure, his character structure” – which is rooted in the western psyche.

    Towards a better world…

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  12. Torquemada says:

    I haven’t read Jensen’s books, but am familiar with his ideas, and consider them to be spot on. I agree that planet will take care of itself – as it has done forever – when we’re gone, but the issue I have is that while we’re still here, we have a responsibility to ensure that the situation doesn’t get worse. Perhaps Jensen has it right, that we need to destroy industrial civilisation.

    Unfortunately for those who like their chicken wings hot, their sneakers limited editions, their cars fast and their natural world at arm’s length or in cages, this is anathema.

    The sooner we make some headway in appealing to common sense and arrest our rampant environmental destruction, the better. Sitting around rationalising the issue is about as useful as pissing on an atomic bomb to put the fire out.

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  13. The jackal speaks lies says:

    Doesn’t Mahala like criticism any more? Seems my previous comment didn’t meet with editorial approval, hopefully this is more acceptable.

    Carlos says: “What the climate establishment won’t admit is that plenty of respected scientists quietly doubt that carbon emissions are the main cause of warming.”

    This is not true. Since 2007, no scientific body of national or international standing has maintained a dissenting opinion. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_opinion_on_climate_change)

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  14. Roger Young says:

    @TJSPL

    May I step into the fray?

    1. Sometimes on this site, for some reason, longer comments just don’t appear. We don’t know why, we’ve tried everything. It’s a pain, but a browser refresh and a repost normally does the trick, sorry.

    2. While I think you statement (or quote) “Since 2007, no scientific body of national or international standing has maintained a dissenting opinion.” may well be true, I would seriously doubt the wiki as a reliable source.

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  15. Andy says:

    hey jackal – it’s just a bug in the system. We don’t delete or censor any of comments – unless they’re spam – but sometimes our security numbers fuck out and your post doesn’t get loaded. If that happens the best thing is just to use the back button, and depending on your browser, your comments are normally saved.

    Sorry, and hope that helps.

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  16. Teotwawki says:

    Carlos,
    Your comment, “Renewable energy technology will take many years of development before it’s cheap and efficient enough to power our economies,” is simply not true. Eskom have earmarked R600 billion for nuclear power projects. Directing that money towards renewable technology that already exists (off the shelf technology in fact) would result in SA being able to keep up with current and projected demand. In fact, you could have a wind farm up and running in 2 years versus the 10-15 years it takes to get a power station on line. There is however, no political will….and there is no political will because the populous do not demand it. And they do not demand because articles like yours create doubt, even thought the logic behind the change to renewables is irrefutable.

    “Skepticism is in order – not just because of the various vested interests, but because the hypothesis itself is anti-poor. It demands a course of action that could wreck the developing world’s low-tech, commodity-driven economies. Hundreds of millions of poor people will probably get even poorer if the world reduces its carbon output significantly.”
    Earth to Carlos. Everyone needs to get poorer. Not just the poor. If your only concern is for the poor, you’ve missed the point completely. The planet is what matters, sacrifices will have to be made, people will have to change…they’ll have to actually reconnect with Earth and realise what we’ve all forgotten…without a planet we’re all fucked! Hard decisions need to be made now, sacrifices need to be made now because if not, the future is not going to be very pleasant for anyone, no matter how rich or poor you are.

    Besides all the above, your article is so misguided. As Berry states above, it’s not just climate change, it’s climate change coupled with our destruction of the planet. Write something that actually encourages people to look around with awe at the planet we live on, make them want to help it instead of chewing it up and spitting it out. It’s in your best interests too, not just mine.

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  17. Andy says:

    then just re-submit

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  18. Berry says:

    @Torquemada,
    Do yourself a favour and try to get hold of his book, Endgame…there’s not a lot in there that I disagree with. As DJITK says above, he really is the only sane public commentator out there at the moment. The irony is he’ll be considered loopy by the majority, although it is the other way around.

    “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the State can shield the people from the political, economic and/or military consequences of the lie. It thus becomes vitally important for the State to use all of its powers to repress dissent, for the truth is the mortal enemy of the lie, and thus by extension, the truth is the greatest enemy of the State.” Joseph Goebbels

    “State” being Big Corporate.

    And I think Jensen is completely right, the only way out is to destroy industrial civilisation. Big ask.

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  19. Torquemada says:

    @Berry – Sounds like it contains just the right mix of emotional hyperbole that I’ll like. To the bookstore I go.

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  20. IamaHorror says:

    Ahooo I know more than you, aherp! To this torquemada guy, THE FUCK?
    Reading comments on Mahala is always more interesting/funny than reading the actual article because it’s one small minded twat after the other trying to show off their knowledge (that they probably went on the internet just after reading this article and found) to get some kind of boner for themselves and validate their existance. The writer has an opinion, whether his facts are entirely reliable is besides the point. If everytime you didn’t agree with something someone said, well that would just be a little fucking sad now wouldn’t it? So stop trying to show us your great internet knowledge, and matric A class english and grow up, and do something instead of bitching on the internet.

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  21. The jackal speaks lies says:

    OK, a mixed bag of responses…

    @ Andy, thanks for the clarification, I am relieved to hear that Mahala is still the free press platform the world so badly needs… My original piece still has “Your comment is awaiting moderation. ” next to it, I will try and resubmit if this doesn’t sort itsself out.

    @ Torquemada – I am astounded that you have not yet read Jensen. Do yourself a favour, you’re in for a treat.

    @ Roger Young – Wiki is not the sole source of this quote, it’s just the easiest for people to find. This information is provided by http://www.350.org who are about as trustworthy as you can find in this field.

    @ Teotwawki – spot on mate, so true.

    On the doubt creation/renewable issue, be aware of the level of propaganda and deceit out there. I recently saw some scandalous “educational” posters printed by a company called greenprint singing the praises of nuclear whilst simultaneously dissing solar, wind, etc. In a table comparison of the pros and cons of each, the only negative they could find for nuclear was “poor public perception, based on inaccurate outdated information” – i.e. if you don’t like nuclear, you’re an idiot. According to the poster, wind was too expensive whilst nuclear was cheap and quick, simple and modular – “like lego” (direct quote). Several tens of thousands of these posters were distributed into schools, this is the information that the youth are getting. And who paid for the posters? PBMR (Pebble Bed Modular Reactor) that’s who.

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  22. The jackal speaks lies says:

    This was the first comment I posted but it didn’t show up – here it is again – sorry if repeat…

    ———————————————————————

    Carlos, you actually ARE talking out of your arse, not just expressing a different point of view. As Paul Gilding says, skepticism in science is good, but it translates into denialism in the broader community, and you are guilty of it here.

    Your statement “What the climate establishment won’t admit is that plenty of respected scientists quietly doubt that carbon emissions are the main cause of warming” is quite wrong. Since 2007, no scientific body of national or international standing has maintained a dissenting opinion. (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_opinion_on_climate_change). Do yourself (and your readers) a favour and educate yourself before you reveal your ignorance. A good place to start is http://www. 350.org.

    Your claim – “Besides, we can’t afford to fret about the weather. We’re too busy trying to get out of the ghetto.” – is laughable. Climate change will make any other effort to reduce poverty totally meaningless. People seem to forget that there is no economy without an environment for it to take place in. And who is going to be worst affected – those with wealth or those without?

    “In the meantime, shouldn’t we all stop driving and flying and building houses and buying stuff that isn’t made in our regions?” – yes this is exactly what we should do, as well as stop buying huge quantities of cr*p that we don’t need, stop breeding like rabbits, and accept that we are not gods but part of nature and subject to its limits. But it’s much easier to stick our heads in the sand and write misleading, guilt-assuaging, buck-passing piles of cr*p like this.

    It’s a sad day when a piece like this is published on a site like Mahala. I have always been very proud of and loyal to Mahala – traditionally a beacon of rational thought and common sense, a source of accurate and good content, with a strong sense of social responsibility. In this instance I am disappointed and disgusted.

    ———————————————————————

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  23. Andy says:

    Comment needed to be approved because the system thought it was spam with the two URL mentions. Normally allows you to give one URL, but two is deemed spam. Sorry about that.

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  24. Yet Another Derrick Jensen Fan says:

    I don’t have time to find the direct quote, but Jensen poses a question in Endgame which I think is worth us all considering at this point. I am paraphrasing, but it is something along the lines of:

    If someone placed a plastic bag over your head, or over the head of a loved one, and offered you money to not resist, would you accept this?

    What will it take for you to resist, for us to resist? Sure, doing lip service to “going green” and making minor lifestyle adjustments is not enough. Truly addressing our problems require far greater steps and Carlos is right, we need to be honest about this. There is no doubt that stepping off the fossil fueled speed train of environmental destruction will be uncomfortable for those of us lucky enough to be riding inside, and even for the poor clinging desperately to the outside, their alternatives having been destroyed. So much has already been laid to waste that the landing will be tougher than it ever was before the train got going. But wake up folks – it’s heading for a cliff edge (not to mention the thousands of species of roadkill). Pretending that it isn’t is just stupid, no matter how clever or thoughtful the pretense.

    Oh, and did I mention that we’re running out of fuel?

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  25. Doctor L. says:

    Although, to be fair, it really isn’t that important if you consider how some of the poor won’t live until June.

    You know, in terms of immediacy and all that. Shit, in fact I’d actually get to work actively destroying the fucking earth if I lived like some of the people we see in this country whenever, of course, we lower our eyes from cosmic ponderance.

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  26. Moose says:

    I don’t even know where to start. This is a well written but deeply flawed article.
    The authors final point “I’m not arguing there’s nothing to worry about. But if we’re not prepared to radically curb our lifestyles in response to what the scientists are telling us, then we should be honest about it.” is certainly true.

    What is not true is that the jury is somehow still out about the cause of climate change. Quoting a few dissenting scientific opinions does not mean the Science is not in. It is and the consensus ius very clear. Climate Change Denial is very similar to AIDS/HIV denial in this way: You can always find a few dissenters, some are honest scientists, but most are attention seeking liars in the pocket of special interests.

    There is no doubt that some climate change scientists are guilty of trumping up their case too. (For a thorough dissection of this go to monbiot.com) and its true that there is now a giant industry growing around climate change and carbon credits, none of which address the problem (which will require drastic action, visionary leadership and hard choices).

    However, the majority of scientific opinion that man made climate change is real has only grown over the last decade. To portray it as a coin toss that we can ignore for now is simply disingenuous.

    A final thought.
    Even if it the doomsday predictions are somewhat likely and not absolutely likely- shouldn’t we act in prudence? Are the risks not simply to high not to?
    We are making plans to shoot down life threatening asteroids for god sakes. Climate change is potentially much more likely and just as serious for life on earth.

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  27. Berry says:

    If you watch this and if you can’t argue then send it on…. It’s worth the 9 minutes as the argument is quite solid

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zORv8wwiadQ&feature=related

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  28. The Triffids Will Rise says:

    Hey, what’s all the fuss?

    1. this planet is a lot older than our species and it has been through a lot worse.
    2. we’re all going to die, some of us horribly.
    3. it ain’t what you do, it’s the way that you do it.

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  29. Moose says:

    @thetriffidwillrise
    Tell that to your children when they inherit a fucked planet with the nearest inhabitable new one light years away. oh and we burned the oil. the most useful natural substance on earth. we burned it. the animals. oops we killed most of them and lost millions of years worth of genetic gold. the plants. we still have soy and corn.

    But we did it in style. so its all ok then.

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  30. JD says:

    Here Here!

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  31. Doctor L. says:

    Why have children?

    Really, now. I thought you guys were smart.

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  32. JD says:

    off topic: hey “JD”, the expression you were looking for is “hear, hear.” Also, try another username, mmmkay?

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  33. Torquemada says:

    @Dr L: Hear! Hear!

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  34. Finger in the dyke, anyone? says:

    “Some reckon our best strategy is simply to prepare for higher sea levels. Building dykes around the Cape Flats might be a good idea.”

    See: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8369236.stm

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  35. Water Baby says:

    I think anyone who is in any doubt as to the effects of climate change and its repercussions for those who live on the coast should take themselves along to the high water mark and observe the consequences first hand. If you haven’t, you don’t know what you’re talking about.

    As someone who has spent the last 25 years living on the edge of the Indian Ocean, I know the effects. I see them every single time I go to the beach. And I’m not talking about one beach, in one area. I’m talking about Port Edward, Hibberdene, Margate, Umzumbe, Ballito, Kosi Bay, Umhlanga, Umdloti and many, many more – in fact, I believe it would be fair to say that the entire coast of KwaZulu-Natal has been affected.

    Speak to the environmental scientists and the architects who work for the city of Durban, and ask them why they’ve had to build sea walls – for the first time EVER – along Umhlanga and Umdloti’s seafront. Maybe in Jozi or wherever the writer lives they never got to hear about the storm surges of the last couple years. It sounds like it, otherwise he’d be singing a different tune.

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  36. The Triffids Will Rise But Before They Do They Need To Go Home And Change Into Something Cooler says:

    Climate change is a hot topic.

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  37. Pauly says:

    I take great heed of Moose’s careful controlled response so should we all

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  38. Lychees says:

    I smell an environmental lobby. Thank you for smoking the planet.

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  39. Bushpig says:

    … pwaarhahahaha … only way to stop the calamity … stop breeding …

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