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Should We Fight Back, The Parlotones

Apartheid Videos

by Andy Davis / 23.06.2011

Now that we have a hotline to the Parlotones, a little red handset in Kahn’s bedroom known as the “Mahala Phone”, we thought we’d call him about the recent brouhaha surrounding their video for the single “Should we Fight Back?” The song is probably the Parlotones most overtly political offering to date. A welcome shift for those of us who cannot stomach the saccharine soft-cock-pop-rock dribbling of their previous productions. But is this the musical version of the old DA slogan?

The band courted further controversy when they canned the original big budget (in South African terms) music video for making, uh, “too big a statement” and relying on some rather “limp clichés”. We just had to hit the speed-dial and get Kahn on the line.

The Parlotones

“Should We Fight Back?” What’s the song all about?

The song was inspired by Nelson Mandela’s Long Walk to Freedom. During Apartheid the ANC (for many years) adopted a policy of passive resistance inspired by Gandhi’s passive resistance movement that ultimately brought about revolutionary change in India leading to India’s independence. The ANC followed this policy despite the oppressive and sometimes violent actions of the ruling party at the time. The notion of resisting retaliation amongst those conditions must have made people feel totally worthless (devoid of self-respect and pride), such as the events that unfolded at the Sharpeville Massacre. I can imagine being heart broken if my loved ones and I were being continuously victimized and having to practice restraint by “turning the other cheek”. For so long this policy never worked and Mandela himself fought with the leaders (of the ANC) at the time to allow for a policy of fighting violence with violence. However even then their policy of fighting with violence was admirable as it involved using sabotage to invoke inconvenience and panic rather than inflict any harm on another human being, such as bombing a railway track at night during downtime. The song flits between documenting those events and just being purely inspirational on a metaphorical level, we’re often faced with internal battles or life struggles where we often contemplate quitting. Madiba’s story certainly motivates me because he was unwavering in his dreams and ideals despite what seemed an improbable struggle but yet achieved great things, if he managed to stay motivated our daily struggles seem miniscule. The Long Walk to Freedom is certainly ten times more inspirational than any self-help book could ever pretend to be.

Should We Fight Back, The Parlotones

It’s quite unusual for you guys to make music that’s so overtly political. Why the sudden change?

I’ve always felt that music should be a cathartic experience. My whole life in South Africa has been a political overload. It’s been exciting knowing that I’m living in a very significant and beautiful part of South African history, blemishes and all, but I’ve always felt that people are tired of hearing about it and usually the emphasis is skewed towards the negative, with all the “if it bleeds it leads” headlines. So I’ve always tried to write escapist type music, music that doesn’t deny that the human experience is marred with ups and downs but that the experience itself is a gift and that even though we experience pitfalls there is much to celebrate. However we are all a product of our environment and we’re moulded by a collection of adventures, so growing up in Joburg it’s only obvious that the political landscape will bleed into my consciousness and then my song writing, which is an extension of self, observation of surroundings and basically social commentary. It’s not our only political song, previous ones include: “Lets start a fight”, “RadioContolledRobot” (social commentary), “Pointing fingers” on this current album Stardust Galaxies songs that contain political and social undertones are: “Welcome to the weekend”, “Remember when…”, “Brighter side of hell” but I guess you wouldn’t know this because you’ve probably never judged us on an entire body of work but rather on the radio singles.

In the original video there’s a whole then and now scenario – showing the struggles of apartheid in contrast to today – is that the point you were trying to make there? And how does that relate to the message of the song?

To be honest it was the director’s creation. Although the quality was good we didn’t like the finished product and felt it never really achieved what it set out to achieve and so we scrapped it. We felt it tried to make too big a statement in too little time by borrowing on rather limp cliché’s, it didn’t quite elevate. The director is brilliant and has created some excellent videos but for us this one didn’t quite work. We then filmed another video that rather reflects the social problems of the universal world today; the imagery is largely inspired by the works of Banksy and like-minded artists who provide a wealth of social commentary in one visual display. We got a lot of flack (possibly from the friends of the crew, cast and the director) for not using the initial one but it’s ultimately our product and if we feel we don’t like it we should not be obligated to use it on the basis that we may hurt someone’s feelings.

Should We Fight Back, The Parlotones

Did you know that “Fight Back” was the slogan of the DA when Tony Leon was in charge and it was largely seen as being oppositional and negative and personifying the position of “liberal” white privilege. As far as political campaigns go it bombed… did you want to tie into that?

Now that you bring it up I do remember but I assume based on my previous answer that you’re aware that this slogan was in NO way the inspiration behind the song.

Check the official video below:

And read our in depth Parlotones interview here.

Should We Fight Back, The Parlotones

Visual interpretation of Mahala's relationship with the Parlotones

5   1
RESPONSES (47)
  1. Anonymous says:

    Kahns insistance that we judge them on the entire body of work and not just the singles, something he was shouting about last time too, is pretty annoying.
    Kahn, lets ask you: When you listen to a new band, do you go through their entire recorded collection before making up your mind about them?

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  2. Anonymous says:

    Limp cliches? Like your new video?
    Business men running on a hamster wheel. Shredding votes. Plastic girls concerned with physical beauty.
    No tired limp cliches there!
    Man, apartheid, such a limp cliche!

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  3. Anonymous says:

    i think most of the flack they got for not using the original was not cause it hurt someones feelings, but cause it further highlighted how quick the parlotones are willing to jump on board a band wagon (one thats branded too, I am sure) but not the conviction to stand by their claims.
    When writing a song inspired by Nelson Mandela, called ‘should we fight back’ that is steeped in political swagger, it would be nice if you guys acted like you had the balls to stand by it instead of going for the whole ‘Banksy Inspired’ feel. I mean, UK street stencil art with coppers having a piss on a monkey queen mother. Totally relating to that shit RIGHT NOW.

    Idiots. You went the Nelson mandela route cause you thought it would encourage more sales (just like Mahala thought Parlotones would encourage more hits). It created a good dynamic against your Germany ‘Bring it Home’ exported patriotism. In the media it made you look good, overseas it gave you alliances with the whole trendy political topic SA is associated it. Did you have any desire to back that up with integrity, to encourage any social change on the back of your marketing ploy? The music itself is empty and weak, and so you had a small chance to piggyback a message in a visual medium. But you didn’t. You should some chick with plastic surgery lines and thought, ‘Boy, this is some cutting edge social commentary right here!’.

    It is your product, you’re right. But dont ever lose sight of that and start calling it art.

    Hey Mahala: you’re just as bad. rely on quality, not controversy. We all know your parlotones interview got you more hits than the last few months, but dont sell out when trying to imply someone is selling out.

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  4. Kropotkin says:

    I like this song. Nice message.

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  5. Anonymous says:

    sorry for errors, english is not my first language.

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  6. Carol Reed says:

    Give it a rest, jesus.

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  7. Andy says:

    Hey Carol how about doing your homework!?

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  8. Dplanet says:

    Ah yes, nothing better than social commentary coming from a grown man wearing crying clown mascara limply singing over insipid pop music. Really gets my juices flowing.

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  9. Zam says:

    The judge on all your music thing is tiring. Half of my favorite artists, I haven’t even listened to their entire catalogue (and those are bands I admire, respect and revere).

    Why would I force myself to listen to 3 hours or more of the parlotones, listening intently to every word or note finding that one good song? It’s irrational.

    But I wish you and the parlotones the best of luck!

    And Mahala, I love you guys, but this comes off as a pretty blatant attempt to receive more hits (which it will undoubtedly will).

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  10. Barry Bonds says:

    Jesus, the official video is terrible.
    Another massive stale yawn.

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  11. Rol says:

    The Parlotones will never will be my cup of tea, but really, I’m inclined to give them some benefit of the doubt.

    To invest huge time, dollar and effort in a video and to subsequently realise that the end product is not what you first envisioned – it takes a degree of testicular fortitude to set fire to it and start again. It shows they do have some respect for their own brand, it demonstrates that they were even willing to hurt some peoples feelings to protect whatever it was they\d envisioned, and that they’re willing to defend their choices.

    On the other hand, half of you anonymous bitches out there won’t even put your names behind your poisonous half-arsed rantings. Khan has enough guts and self-belief to put himself out on mahala knowng that it doesn’t matter what answers he might give, he’s in for another slandering.

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  12. come on says:

    SO FUCKING BORING. jeez.

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  13. Phumlani says:

    “The ANC followed this policy despite the oppressive and sometimes violent actions of the ruling party at the time. The notion of resisting retaliation amongst those conditions must have made people feel totally worthless (devoid of self-respect and pride), such as the events that unfolded at the Sharpeville Massacre. I can imagine being heart broken if my loved ones and I were being continuously victimized and having to practice restraint by “turning the other cheek”. For so long this policy never worked and Mandela himself fought with the leaders (of the ANC) at the time to allow for a policy of fighting violence with violence. However even then their policy of fighting with violence was admirable as it involved using sabotage to invoke inconvenience and panic rather than inflict any harm on another human being, such as bombing a railway track at night during downtime.” i love empathy 🙂

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  14. come on says:

    Hey Mahala: you’re just as bad. rely on quality, not controversy.

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  15. Stranj says:

    Why are the two options in this song “fight back” or “swallow our pride”?

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  16. Anonymous says:

    Rol: Bands do that all the time.
    Enmity, a local CT underground ‘metal’ act have spent money, time and effort on two separate music videos and scrapped them both cause the quality wasn’t up to scratch. you dont need to be the Parlotones to have a quality benchmark.

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  17. Andy says:

    OK just want to jump in here. The Parlotones could quite rightly claim to be the biggest rock band in South African history. Here they’ve written a very political song (by their standards) produced and then pulled the video at great expense… and we had an exclusive interview with Kahn talking about it. How is that not relevant, or a brazen attempt to court controversy? Surely we’re just doing what we’re supposed to do here at Mahala… interrogate culture and how it relates to our society…

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  18. Rol says:

    Great, thanks for steering me straight:
    So, Enmity make underground metal and stay true to their artistic vision, and their credibility is unimpeachable.
    The Parlotones makes commercially viable poprock and stick to their artistic vision, they have no credibility.
    If they were unhappy with the video and released it anyway, they’d be slated. They were unhappy with the video, said ‘we can do better’, squashed it and made another one – now they’re being slated.
    Damned if they do and damned if they don’t, is how I read it.

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  19. Dplanet says:

    I think it’s quite interesting that they started with a video showing images of Apartheid oppression. Maybe they thought that co-opting such imagery would be pushing their credibility as revolutionaries a little too far.

    The second attempt is much more on-brand in that it’s a much more generic, limp attempt at social commentary.

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  20. Anonymous says:

    @ Rol
    by taking another approach with their video, they compromised the integrity of their message.
    If they weren’t happy with the execution, start again, by all means. I dont fault that.
    However, to then change direction entirely and steer focus away from the original intent of the song itself, making something safer and more marketable, they rob themselves of any kind of integrity and put themselves into the framework of another marketed product.

    It forces me to question the relevance of their original intent in the song. It forces me to accommodate the fact that hey, singing about mandela and apartheid might generate some interest. I dont walk away feeling like they wanted to encourage positive change.
    They took power away from themselves. They decided to render their message impotent.

    I mean, they originally decided to take on a meaty, difficult and tricky topic. They failed. So they went the safe route. Instead of apartheid we got some kid pulling some fat cats around. We got a businessman stuck in a rut going no where. We got a girl considering plastic surgery.

    If you can equate the message of one to the blatant cliches of the other, then your opinion on the topic doesn’t hold much weight for me anyway.

    Dont sing about Apartheid if you dont have the balls to get your hands dirty. Then just stay away from it, cause you’re not worthy. But dont open that door cause you’ll look cool and relevant to your friends and then try slam it shut when shit comes pouring out.

    I am offended by the thought that Apartheid has been turned into a marketing element for this band. That is capitalism at it’s most disgusting and self absorbed.
    Had they backed it up I would have shut my mouth. But they went safe and soft and cliche instead. Not wining any points here.

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  21. Anonymous says:

    “We got a lot of flack for not using the initial one but it’s ultimately our product and if we feel we don’t like it we should not be obligated to use it on the basis that we may hurt someone’s feelings.”

    That is the attitude towards this that is bothering me.
    Apartheid, our history, is not the parlotones product. Their music video is, sure. Their song is, sure. But you take on a topic like that and you accept some responsibility for it as well.

    Now it’s come down to ‘what sells better’.
    If anyone thinks that the imported ideals and cliches from the second official video ring true with any ideals that resonant with our history and past, then you are the dumb kind of fan that the parlotones need.

    It wasn’t pulled cause of sensitivity to our history. It was pulled cause of quality complaints, and being too visually descriptive of truth Because fans might not respond well to it. Not from an emotional point of view, but from a sales point of view.

    so yeah. fuck them. thats my history too, bitches. I dont want it being sold overseas in crisp HD as some guy on a fucking hamster wheel.

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  22. Jim Reeves says:

    At least in the original version Kahn wasn’t wearing that stupid fucking makeup. The rest of the band look like they’d rather be at home, possibly taking a shit or eating a banana.

    I wasted time here.

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  23. Grant W says:

    Not a literary great or a pained artist so I hesitate to point out the complete redundancy in the term “limp cliche”. In this context any cliche would be limp…not so? So what we are saying to the Parlotones is that we, in this wisened and enlightened forum, do not want to hear music or see videos about the issues of everyday life for that must, by nature, be a cliche. Do not, for us, produce music that highlights the drudgery of existence that we can identify with but rather dazzle us with a display of artistic insight that eludes the majority and resonates with the thinking minority. Instead of “apartheid”, which we have all experienced to death, sing about the insights of Gogol or the athiesm of Bertrand Russell. Write rocking anthem about a foursome in the pitch dark involving substance supositories, a ballade about beastiality or get into the mind of your friend, the serial killer. I doubt you would sell nearly as many albums but your street cred in this little clique would go through the roof.

    And while I am on the topic…how cliched is the little graphic at the bottom of this page? Shacks and taxi’s in the e’kasie. Never seen that before in an artistic representation of our city. It is only one level above the tired old skyline graphic. Oh, wait, that one’s in the heading. Oops.

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  24. Anonymous says:

    hey fuck Mahalas integrity too, that was hardly ever in debate.
    I dont think people feel defined here as a minority group under the banner of ‘Mahala’.
    It’s just a random collection of people over a wide spectrum of influences and cultures who come here to give voice to their thoughts (hate) for popular local culture. Mahala provides the surgery table and then we all get to play dissection.
    But I dont think we’d all wear the same team colours out in public with any pride or anything.

    Yeah, fuck that little graphic down there! Fuck that stupid advert up top that expands right over the whole Mahala name and heading every time your mouse glides over it too. I mean, that right there is the definition of sell out. Someone should screen cap it and submit it for a ‘Kif’ or ‘Kak review.

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  25. Grant W says:

    Random collection my ass. Mahala has a brand, a message and they create a forum that resonates with a particular type. If you going to poke holes you gonna get poked so make sure you are as good as you like to give out. There is a typical teenage herd mentality that takes over when we try to decide what is kif/cool and what is kak/aus. It would be a pity for that to drown out the true insight that so many here have to give. There is no doubt that Mahala is a quality forum but it might also do well to realise that harsh criticism exposes one to the same.

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  26. Odidiva says:

    Seriously !?

    Didn’t even know the music video existed, Parlotones, not really on my radar. But its nice that there r Clear & Present reminders of our past, for all those oblivious to it.

    Because when history starts to repeat itself e.g. Bheki Cele’s militarised and violent Police force, some of us will know the signs before shit hits the fan.

    Thanks for the article. The cynics can quite frankly “piss-off” Parlotones are hugely successful and consciousness is not new for them, look at their SABC 3 Green campaign. Maybe The Parlotones fans n supporters want to live in an “Australian” version of South Africa, but even the DA learnt from that “Fight B(L)ACK” campaign and came back with the talented GodZILLE, DeLille n Mazibuko, maybe now you will know what Youth Day is about, and remember to commemorate it.
    Thank You

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  27. Anonymous says:

    @GrantW – I agree, entirely. But I think you’ll find a large percentage of Mahala readers are very vocal Mahala critics as well. So dont worry, it’s being taken care of.

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  28. Grant W says:

    I think that is kif.

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  29. Andy says:

    Grant W… the term “limp cliché” is a direct quote from Kahn in reference to the video. Did you read the article?

    Talk about a knee-jerk. I’m gonna give anonymous the benefit of the doubt because i really like this: “Mahala provides the surgery table and then we all get to play dissection.”

    And sorry about the expand-a-banner. It’s not ideal. We’re reviewing whether we’ll allow rich media like that from now on… because that’s much too touchy and it gets in my way all the time.

    I personally dig the illustrations of the city above and the kasi below… but it’s been 2 years now. We’re in the midst of a redesign. Thanks

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  30. RYAN KRUGER DIRECTOR says:

    everyone is back and forth with this vid, it was my concept the 1st video was great working with the guys, i personly thought it was a ground breaking video for SA if it was released properly. To show off the then and now to see the growth of SA. I wouldn’t say the vid had limp cliche’s. It wasn’t any where near as CONTROVERSIAL as they saw it.The vid online is the directors cut, the only thing different from the directors cut to the real cut was the 2 bloody shots. i think it was the white guilt by the cops in the video that made it bad, but hey thats history man. The parlotones did get a lot of comments by some of the people and extra’s that worked on the set and a lot of the other comments were fans of the parlotones, i have received about 70 to 80 emails from fans talking about the vid mainly in good favor.

    As i said to Kahn i completely understand if they didn’t want to release it 100percent as its there choice and there product which is fair. i thought it gave a great message as we have to show more of the bad times than the good times as we live in the present and we have grown. Great guys wish them all the best. We cant please everyone.

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  31. whatevea says:

    boring.. think its a band on the way out trying to stay in the media..yawn..

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  32. Anonymous says:

    The Parlotones are one of, if not the BIGGEST South African band, surely their decisions are working well for them.

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  33. Anonymous says:

    At least the parlotones admit when they dont want to release something, its better than sitting in the back letting people do what they want, this is why they do so well

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  34. Grant W says:

    No worries Andy, I am a limp cliche too and yes I did read the article. Not so much a criticism of the site, more of the comments and the vibe which can tend toward the artistically aloof and hyper-critical sometimes. Simply making the point that being a critic means you will get looked at more keenly. Dig what you guys are doing. I do think the graphic has been done but honestly I don’t really give a fuck. It looks fine, I am here for the content and was only making a point.

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  35. Andy says:

    I think we can all get along now. I’ll get the first round!

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  36. Dplanet says:

    The expanding banner is pretty annoying but if it helps you guys keep doing what you do, then I’ll happily just ignore it.

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  37. ryan says:

    😉

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  38. responder says:

    fucking parlotones.

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  39. Mark says:

    I think the original would have been misinterpreted. I prefer the one that was released.

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  40. piss artist. says:

    “WHAT ABOUT THE CHICKENS YOU FUCKERS!?”

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  41. KillaOpinions says:

    @ GrantW

    Your list of original or inspired ideas….Really?

    I think you may find that each one of those ideas has been explored and exploited in multiple genres…

    For fun: take each of your very best attempts at originality and search Google. I think you may find that once you put your ideas into the public domain, that you are suddenly not the the fastest chicken in the run… Original thought as a philosophical premise is not easily encountered.

    Once you have Googled away in English, try every other language group, library and oral tradition and I doubt you are capable of providing this forum with a single, truly original thought….

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  42. Anonymous says:

    KillaOpinions: Hello. Please direct your google machine to ‘sarcasm’.

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  43. KillaOpinions says:

    Think you will find what you have written is not in fact sarcasm….

    Again, do you have a single original thought?

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  44. UglyNonce says:

    That old video (APartheid vs Modern era) is so cliched and hack. Wish the director would recognise that, retire and fuck off back to working in a CD store.

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  45. Kelly says:

    ARAB-NAZISM & GENOCIDE = ROOTS OF ‘APARTHEID-COMPARISON’ THESIS UPON ISRAELI BEAUTIFUL DEMOCRACY

    Ahmad shukairy Arab-nazi has invented the apartheid slur (upon pluralistic democratic Israel, six years before the so-called “occupation” excuse came about) in 1961 [“Politics, lies, and videotape: 3,000 questions and answers on the Mideast crisis” – Page 392 – Yitschak Ben Gad – SP Books, 1991 – 479 pages], he helped the (ally of Adolf Hitler, al-Husseini, better known as the) Mufti and aided in extermination of Jews in WW2, according to testimony in Congress. [Congressional record: proceedings and debates of the United States Congress: Volume 113, Part 12 – United States. Congress – Govt. Print. Off., 1967 – Page A-525]. The same Shukairy admitted in 1956 that so-calle “Palestine” is NOTHING but a part of Syria… [United Nations review: Volume 3 – United Nations. Dept. of Public Information, United Nations. Office of Public Information – 1957 – Page 8] Then, in 1963, he changed his mind, and the ‘new nationalism’ is ‘conveniently’ used -since then- by Arab immigrants’ children who call themselves as “Palestinians” since 1963. He’s more famous for coining the Palestine Liberation Organization’s genocide slogan ‘Drive the Jews into the Sea’ [America’s Two Holy Wars – John Tyler – Page 246].

    ARAB MUSLIM APARTHEID

    All the while the Arab world and the Muslim world are the largest practitioners of racial and religious apartheid. Where not one minority has equal rights with the governing power. Not to mention the still-practiced racist slavery on Asians and on blacks by Arabs. And the ethnic cleansing by the Arab world including by anti-Christian, anti-Jewish Arab-Islamic-Apartheid-Palestine.
    To quote from books: The Islamic world “the world’s largest practitioner of both religious and gender apartheid.” [Israel: And the Palestinian Nightmare – Page 158 – Ze’ev Shemer – 2010 – 244 pages] “The Islamic culture of “religious intolerance, economic backwardness, gender apartheid, muzzled press, militarism, terrorism.” [A theory of international terrorism: understanding Islamic militancy – Page 153 – L. Ali Khan – 2006 – 371 pages] The “antisemitism of the Arab world and the Muslim world.” The racist “long history of oppression against minorities in Arab countries.” [U.S. news & world report: Volume 131, Issues 8-18 – U.S. News Pub. Corp., 2001 – Page 120]

    PALLYWOOD

    The lying Arab-Palestinian Goliath machine not only lies and denies Israel’s extending more rights to Arabs than to Jews (like favortism in court, affirmative action and exemption from military service), but also fabricates “memorandums” like a supposed speech by N. Mandela which was actually written by an Arab residing in the Netherland… The Arab lobby also aided J. Carter (the one who wrote a hate book in 2006 with almost an exact title of that by Palestinian-Arab M. Bishara in 2002), who uttered anti-Jewish bigoted statements like: ‘stating Freeman’s recommendations for council board members contained “too many Jews.”‘ [Living in the Times of the Signs – Page 219 – David R. Barnhart – 2007 – 492 pages]

    AIM

    The racist Arab “apartheid” slander campaign (like infamous ‘apartheid week’) has been rocked by usual anti-Jewish hatred outbursts, including calls to kill Jews, Swastikas, etc. [M. Ignatieff: Israel Apartheid Week and CUPE Ontario’s anti-Israel posturing should be condemned.” National Post, March 05, 2009] [“Swastikas and Ku Klux Klan Symbols during ‘Apartheid Week…” Israel National News, 3 Mar 2010]

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  46. graham says:

    UglyNonce what the fuck you talking about! ryan could only do something to a point as the band is commercial to fuck, when he said the video was ground breaking he im sure he meant that for SA, as we in south Africa are so far behind everything else, and that’s why people made a big deal out of it, as for the new video that is toooooooooooo cliche and if you cant see that. well whats said is said. and ive know Ryan for 10 years he has never worked in a CD store in his life so get you facts right.

    everyone is back and forth with this vid, it was my concept the 1st video was great working with the guys, i personly thought it was a ground breaking video for SA if it was released properly. To show off the then and now to see the growth of SA. I wouldn’t say the vid had limp cliche’s. It wasn’t any where near as CONTROVERSIAL as they saw it.The vid online is the directors cut, the only thing different from the directors cut to the real cut was the 2 bloody shots. i think it was the white guilt by the cops in the video that made it bad, but hey thats history man. The parlotones did get a lot of comments by some of the people and extra’s that worked on the set and a lot of the other comments were fans of the parlotones, i have received about 70 to 80 emails from fans talking about the vid mainly in good favor.

    As i said to Kahn i completely understand if they didn’t want to release it 100percent as its there choice and there product which is fair. i thought it gave a great message as we have to show more of the bad times than the good times as we live in the present and we have grown. Great guys wish them all the best. We cant please everyone.

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  47. John D says:

    I think that the video was brilliant, and the reason they could not release the first one was because idiots like some of you who commented, would miss interpret it. Stop moaning about nonsense and your stupid opinions, start a band and bring it where They are and maybe then you can give your opinion, because you don’t know what work and passion went into them getting to the top. They Got there, God gave them these great opportunities, and I trust that He also gave them the judgement to choose what to put in a video and what not. If it was yours you would like people to respect you even if they didn’t like or agree with it. If you don’t like it don’t watch it. But don’t go breaking them down, it shows who you are and reflect what you think of yourself.

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